SUMAYYA
10 October 2022
Medically reviewed by
Kajal Jain
M. Pharm
valium-suppository
Table of Contents

Valium was first manufactured in 1959 and came onto the market in 1963. From 1968 to 1982, it ranked as the top-selling drug in the United States, with a total of 2.3 billion pills sold in 1978.

Valium can treat various central nervous system diseases, such as Anxiety, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. It is occasionally used off-label to treat women's pelvic pain.

The most popular medications recommended to treat hypertonic pelvic floor diseases are Valium pills and suppositories. Let's look more closely at how diazepam aids in the treatment of pelvic pain in this section.

What Is Valium (Diazepam)?

Valium, marketed under Valium, is a well-known and commonly prescribed medication. Valium is a benzodiazepine with amnestic, sedative, muscle-relaxant, anxiolytic, and anticonvulsant properties.

It can treat many conditions affecting the central nervous system, such as anxiety, panic disorder, seizures, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. One of its off-label uses is to treat pelvic pain in women.

When activated, most of the effects of valium are assumed to be caused by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. 

Dose and Dosage Forms

  • Tablet: 2mg, 5mg, 10mg
  • Oral solution: 1mg/1ml, 5mg/ml
  • Rectal gel: 2.5mg, 10mg, 20mg
  • Injectable solution: 5mg/ml,
  • Intramuscular device: 5mg/ml
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One of the treatments for pelvic pain, specifically non-relaxing or hypertonic pelvic floor dysfunction, is vaginal Valium. 15% of women experience chronic pelvic pain, and 30% of these women have clinically significant pelvic floor dysfunction. 

The most popular medications to treat hypertonic pelvic floor diseases are- Valium pills and suppositories.

Uses Of Valium Suppository

For controlling seizure: In addition to ensuring fast entry into the body, Valium suppository administration accelerates drug absorption to relieve seizure symptoms.

Off-label, vaginal valium suppositories can be provided to help women with chronic pelvic pain cope better with vaginal physical therapy for high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) when other muscle relaxants fail.

Prescribers often advise patients to take them before sexual intercourse to reduce pelvic pain associated with sex. The drug is introduced as an intravaginal suppository, slowing the onset of its effects.

The medication relieves pain associated with vaginal spasms for around eight hours, which is typically long enough to let women fall asleep more easily following therapy. However, the effects remain longer.

How Does Valium Work?

Valium modulates the postsynaptic effects of GABA-A transmission, increasing presynaptic inhibition. It seems to have calming effects by acting on the thalamus, hypothalamus, and a portion of the limbic system.

Doses

Valium is available in 2 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg tablets. To make the medication easier to insert, a compounding pharmacy creates it as a suppository (cone-shaped medication).

For Control Of Seizures:

Your doctor must calculate the dose for adults and children of two years and older based on body weight. The recommended dose for adults and children of 12 years and above is 0.2 mg per kilogram of body weight.

How Do I Take Valium Suppositories?

Under your doctor's instructions, insert the Valium tablet into your vagina or rectum. If the tablet irritates the tissue in your vagina or rectum, crush it and combine it with another vaginal lubricant before inserting it.

Side effects

  • Memory problems
  • Drowsiness, tired feeling
  • Feeling restless or irritable.
  • Nausea or constipation
  • Loss of interest in sex

Studies Related To Valium Suppository Use

In the Berg and Shinnar trial, 150 of 428 children experienced complex initial febrile seizures: 69 had focal-onset seizures, 59 had multiple seizures, and 56 had extended seizures lasting 10 minutes or more. 27 of 136 children in the same research who had previously encountered febrile seizures experienced two or more episodes.

Several other studies observed multiple seizures during a single febrile illness in 9–16% of the children with a first febrile seizure. These findings imply that using a Valium suppository can decrease the probability of multiple febrile seizures during a single febrile illness. Valium is helpful even after the seizure has ceased and the patient awakens. 

Rogalski's current study assessed intravaginal rather than oral Valium administration as an additional therapy for high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction. 25 out of 26 patients who used adjuvant suppositories reported symptomatic relief, suggesting it could help treat pelvic floor dysfunction.

Valium suppositories also improved the pelvic floor muscle tone and sexual pain associated with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD).

Warnings

  • The use of benzodiazepines and opioids together can cause respiratory depression, coma, extreme drowsiness, and even death.
  • Keep doses and durations to a minimum necessary.
  • Monitor patients for sedation and respiratory depression symptoms.
  • Prescribers need to warn caregivers to report new findings that aren't typical of the patient's characteristic seizure episode.
  • Ascertain the effects of opioid-concomitant use before patients drive or operate heavy machinery.
  • Exercise caution while treating patients with COPD, sleep apnea, kidney or liver disease, open-angle glaucoma, depression, suicidal thoughts, poor gag reflex, a history of drug addiction, or who are obese.
  • Use caution in individuals with a history of substance abuse or acute alcoholism; continued use may lead to tolerance, psychological dependency, and physical dependence.
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using this drug during pregnancy with your doctor. This medication might enter breast milk.
  • It is not advisable to breastfeed while using this medication due to the potential harm to the newborn.

Storage

  • Keep this drug away from heat, moisture, and light. Store it at a temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C).
  • Keep the medication out of children.
  • Discard any unused medication after the expiration date.
  • Avoid flushing or pouring unused drugs down the drain or sink.

Bottom Line From Practical Anxiety Solutions

Abuse and addiction to benzodiazepines present a danger that can result in overdose and death. This medication is administered rectally by a caregiver skilled in distinguishing between your cluster and common seizures.

You and your caregiver must feel confident about adhering to all guidelines provided by your doctor, pharmacist, and product package. Ensure you comprehend when to take this drug, how to take it, and how to monitor any adverse effects or seizure control.

  • Alyssa M. Larish,1 Rozalin R. Dickson,2 Rachel A. Kudgus,3 Renee M. McGovern,3 Joel M. Reid,3 From https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2019.03.003 Obtain On 09/10/2022
  • Larish AM, Dickson RR, Kudgus RA, McGovern RM, Reid JM, Hooten WM, Nicholson WT, Vaughan LE, Burnett TL, Laughlin-Tommaso SK, Faubion SS, Green IC. Vaginal Diazepam for Nonrelaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: The Pharmacokinetic Profile. J Sex Med. 2019 Jun;16(6):763-766. From https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2019.03.003 Epub 2019 Apr 19. PMID: 31010782. Obtain on 09/10/2022
  • Rogalski MJ, Kellogg-Spadt S, Hoffmann AR, Fariello JY, Whitmore KE. Retrospective chart review of vaginal diazepam suppository use in high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction. Int Urogynecol J. 2010 Jul;21(7):895-9. From doi: 10.1007/s00192-009-1075-7. Epub 2010 Jan 12. PMID: 20066399. Obtain on 09/10/2022
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